How To Treat Nausea

Everyday Illnesses Common Remedies
8 Remedies For Treating Nausea

Food allergies, morning sickness, stomach bugs, motion sickness, binge drinking and food poisoning are just some of the things that can cause nausea. Whatever the cause of your nausea, the following are a few simple remedies which can help.

Important: If you are pregnant or taking regular medications, always check with your healthcare provider before taking herbal remedy.

1. Acupressure Point
Use acupressure wrist bands (also known as sea bands) to instantly relieve nausea. They are not only useful for motion sickness, but for other types of nausea too. Wrist bands have a knob which is positioned over an acupressure point in the wrist. For an extra boost, press down on the knob.

acupressure point on wrist for nausea

If you don't have bands, take your thumb and middle finger and press on both sides of the wrist. You should feel symptoms subside in about 30 seconds but it can take up to 5 minutes.

2. Ginger
Eat half a teaspoon of fresh ginger, 3 times a day (try mixing it with some olive oil to create a salad dressing). Although scientists don't know how or why ginger reduces nausea, it certainly appears to. A recent study by the University of Rochester discovered that chemotherapy patients who ate ginger during therapy reported significantly less nausea than those who did not. You could eat ginger snaps or drink ginger ale, but you need to consume significant amounts to get your ginger allowance. Alternatively take 4 tablespoons of ginger syrup a day.

3. Peppermint Oil
Place some peppermint or ginger essential oil under your nose. This really helps to calm a queasy tummy. Alternatively rub peppermint oil on your gums or suck on peppermint candies.

4. Red Raspberry Leaf
Herbal remedy Red Raspberry Leaf is a very effective treatment for nausea. It contains B6, ginger and folic acid. Take 1 capsule, 4 times a day until nausea passes. Manufacturers claim it is suitable for pregnant women and symptoms of morning sickness should improve within 5 days.

5. Eat Little And Often
This will help to regulate your blood sugar and stomach acid levels. Avoid having an empty stomach. Saltine crackers, small quantities of apples, rice, toast and bananas are good options. Don't drink liquids with your meals and avoid drinking tea, coffee and citrus juices.

6. Fresh Air
Go out and have a walk, the fresh air and movement will blast your system back into life. If you are not well enough to walk, stick your head out the window or use a fan on your face.

7. Avoid Dairy
Stay away from milk, cheese and other dairy products until symptoms subside. Lactose intolerance (allergy to dairy, especially milk) is an underlying cause of many cases of nausea. If you suffer from nausea regularly, take note of what you ate 30 minutes to 2 hours before symptoms occurred. If you also develop bloating, cramps and gas, chances are you have a food allergy.

8. Cold Compress
Place a cold face cloth on your head if you are feeling particularly sick, it may make you feel a little better. Alternatively (may sound a little strange) lie down on the floor and place your forehead on a cold tile.

Additional Tips

• Eat slowly.
• If the smell of cooked food makes you sick, eat cold foods or food at room temperature.
• Drink liquids between meals, not during meals.
• Chew on licorice sticks regularly, it helps to soothe the digestive system.
• Drink a small dose of aloe Vera juice once a day, it also helps to soothe the gut.

Related Articles
How to treat food poisoning: Treating nausea caused by something you ate.
How to treat alcohol poisoning: Recognize the symptoms of an emergency.
How to treat indigestion: Nausea, trapped wind and bloating.
How to treat piles: Hemorrhoids treatments.
How to stop farting: How to reduce excess gas.
Abdominal problems: A to Z of symptoms and causes.
How to treat diarrhea: Natural remedies for diarrhea.

• Other health issues? See: How to treat common illnesses.

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